About your Search

20110101
20110131
STATION
SFGTV2 62
SFGTV 55
CSPAN2 15
CNN 12
CSPAN 10
KGO (ABC) 9
MSNBC 7
KTVU (FOX) 6
KCSM (PBS) 5
KNTV (NBC) 5
WMAR (ABC) 5
WBAL (NBC) 4
KPIX (CBS) 3
WJZ (CBS) 3
KOFY 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 211
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 215 (some duplicates have been removed)
of san san francisco's community organizers. throughout process of putting together this workshop we realize we have a lot of things we share in common. one is a belief with more than one person a whole community can come together and build strength and power and make changes. that's the emphasis of everything we are doing today is trying to network and share ideas and build ourselves into a more positive future. that's why we are here. i'm very glad to see you all have come to our session in the morning. i hope that through this workshop you will get the answers you have in terms of how to take that next step in terms of organizing your own neighborhoodses and learn from those who come before you to forge a way to improving the city which is something we all hold very dear. i wanted to say in terms of the to m format we are flexible. there is a general introduction as to who we are and who we serve and our experiences and the tools and strategies we identified to be successful. then we will open it up for you all to decide where you want it to go. we have question cards in the back
amount of multi-modal engagement last year as well. we had a series of workshops, opportunities for community members to come and talk with us in person, including in my office. we had a variety of documents on our website. we will certainly build on those here. commissioner maufas: thank you. my second question was -- you mentioned the shift on some government programs to the local level. i know we do not have the full breadth of understanding of what those things will be, but will we have some idea of what is involved? >> we can certainly give a more detailed description of those specific proposals. we can do that either at the next board meeting on february 8 as part of our budget update -- commissioner maufas: i think probably as we go along, anything you know and that we can let our families and staff know would be appreciated. thank you. president mendoza: thank you. >> great. commissioners, this evening we have two distinguished service and special service awards. to present the first distinguished service award, i would like to call the assistant superintendent to talk a
is that there are a lot of things we don't fund. in our workshop somebody wanted to know if we were talking about a bathroom in a park. we don't do that. it's an object that should come out of an agency's budget. it's not something you that you can involve the community. community will not build a bathroom or maintain a bathroom for 5 yeeshs. they might but that was not the application submitted. >> let's talk about briefly the match because that has to be that requirement has to be met before we talk about the scoring. the point of the match the reason the program was retooled and called the community challenge grant is the idea is to encourage neighborhoods to value themselves and their own work. the grant is unique in the city and in many other cities in that we have placed a dollar value on your volunteer time of 14 dollars an hour. you are allowed to include your volunteer time as the match. as a committee we more strongly favor neighborhoods that come in with the bulk of their volunteer match made up with volunteer time rather than dollars. some projects come in and have the required match
make it, do not fret. there will be a number of discovery workshops. please visit our website for more information on either the enrollment fair or the discovery workshops. we would like to take a moment this evening to think our community advisory committee, who is present this evening in the audience -- to thank our community advisory committee. we want to thank them for their service to san francisco. thank you. president kim: thank you, richard. deputy superintendent carranza won a prize, in recognition of its leadership and work in public education, so, congratulations. [applause] we are proud that we have you on our team. and also for the audience, vice president mendoza is out of the country and will not be in attendance for this ninth meeting. -- for tonight's meeting. we move on. >> what we are working on is that we're going to work with the associate new superintendent to craft a policy that we have worked on, and we will be working with the associate superintendent, and we had a leadership workshop. president kim: the next is our parent advisory council report. >> hi, my nam
. this is a typical comedy workshop at the firm, run by professional comedian clayton fletcher. >> who would like to go next. >> and attended by the staff. >> one thing i strongly discourage is a joke. wait, aren't you a comedy trainer? yes, i am. but i don't want to hear jokes. i want the truth. >> seems a bit like a boondoggle, getting to sit around and laugh with your colleagues while on the clock. but it's not. the mastermind behind these sessions is pepper com's managing partner steve cody who says a little laughter goes a long way when it comes to business. he came up with the idea after trying standup comedy himself. >> have i got a kidney for you. >> you're naked up there, don't have a powerpoint presentation to support you. then i suddenly woke up and said, hey, wait a second, this is really helping me in business, too. i noticed that even though i thought i was a fairly good public speaker and presenter, i was becoming subtly better at reading audiences, at filling those pregnant pauses that occur in any sort of business meeting. i thought to myself, i shouldn't keep this just to me. i
it meets the needs of the parents. we are doing other parents of workshops. we hope sooto increase scores by using support. the research planning and development is insuring that data director has a form for tracking discipline referrals that do not necessarily end in suspension, so we can have a record of that. we want to advertise our schools' successes so they are hearing the good along with what is not so good. we cannot have these unless we have improved school culture at our schools, so we are going to use a tear in response of student -- tiered response to student misconduct. as i mentioned earlier, the practice is a primary tool when working with students. we are doing administrative walk-throughs and giving feedback. we are increasing the number of higher order task to increase riggeour, and we are working on professional wellness. i will turn this up to -- over to guadalupe, and he will answer questions. >> i also have the opportunity to lead a small area team, which includes the executive director for instruction. we are also seeking a new director of outreach to help lead a ne
of what we do, we have gotten into the schools and done workshops. a lot of people can change after they understand how it impacts themselves. we have done a workshop that explores hate speech in a general way. if you can reflect back on a story or experience you had where you felt that, then that can make a difference in how you treat other people. making it real for everyone in the room. >> is bullying a biggest challenge? >> i think it's a question of any kind. i think it really is about to be confident and you feel good about yourself and confident on you are you are willing to celebrate other people. so it's about becoming champions for everyone. >> and how they are raised? >> of course. this is what i would say to a young person, sometimes you have to be your own champion to get through. this be your own champion, find your community. we are out there. there are people all over who are ready to love you and accept you for who you are and talk to people, talk to adults in your life. talk to your family. they may not be ready to hear it, but they do love you and to start with th
the clip board that's come around because even though you signed in when you registered for this workshop that's going to city government. they don't share their information with us. we have no way of contacting you once this workshop is over unless you sign in. i particularly as coalition for san francisco neighborhoods would like to have especially those who said they want to start new organizations or revitalize an organization to get in contact with me or give me your information personally so i can help you with that. as to treasure island i'm going to have to pass on that one to somebody else but i could help you with your organization. not as a specific geographical. >> i'd like to address your question. may be we need to talk off line but it's engaging the residents everything starts as a seed. any idea even with our neighborhood watch programs on a block by block level what we are doing is getting 2 or 3 residents together they form critical mass and they meet and it's a gathering a seed process you have to water it. if there are 3 or 4 of you interested in creating a neighborho
workshops and expos throughout the neighborhood to get people focused on hurricane season. provide them with go kits and for hurricanes you get a warning. they may be last minute with katrina that was the first mandatory evacuation every listed in the staef new orleans. now we want people to know you here the volunteer evacuation. make your move now. map out your route now. these are things we can do today. we have to prepare before the unexpected. the loss of communications and the power outages and even fires that happen after earthquakes and the supply shortages and the food and the water that you have to store. and for broadmoore and new orleans we don't need to go to the grocery store store and stock up it's getting what you need to get on the road to get out of there. there is no last resort in the city of new orleans now. everyone will have to leave. and so we are trying to prepare ourselves and our residents for them to get out and we can't be afraid to talk to our residents and encourage them. this is an example, a neighborhood based evacuation planning guide that broadmoore ha
at the neighborhood empowerment network to talk about safety on your streets. this actual workshop is what we call a 30,000 feet aerial view of what we do. the lower haight motd we created a few models for safety and some are complex and a lot of information. we are going to give you just a little bit of this today. we will talk about how to connect with the different city agencies, your supervisors, your captain at our station. the city attorney's office and beat officers or street officers. one of the things that i would like toit introduce the panel. captain from northern station. regina from the legislative aid of ross mirkarimi one of our supervisors. from the da's office. the president of our merchant's association of the lower haight. ron, a beat officer and antoine another beat officer. the city attorney was at our morning session this morning and had to leave. regina and i work with the city attorneys office and will talk about that today in the lower haight or modo is to build a safe and caring neighborhood and foster that. we believe to build a safe neighborhood you have to build a cari
. the community once again, this message in this workshop is the community that has to step up first. has to step up and push what you want done in your neighborhood. we stepped up. they had hearings. we had everybody a huge amount of people going to the hearings. they went to an appeal hearing because they lost. the appeal hearing we came out again. both times when they went to the hearing and apeels hearing they lost. i will let regina talk about the procedure from her office. >> hello. regina from supervisor mirkarimi's office. he represents the fifth district of san francisco. and the lower haight is one of the areas he represents. and this particular, working with code enforcement as the captain said, in the city attorney's office there are 10 city attorneys one assigned to each station that deals with code enforcement. the code enforcement the city attorney pulls out the code enforcement teams to do the investigations on the properties. they will then bring in an inspector from health or building be it they have an officer with them in case there are safety issues. and if there is issues w
to have in your neighborhood. the focus of this workshop not the workshop the summit today is tow repeatedly hit us over the head with hurricane katrina when the compliment to that which is an earthquake the stronger neighborhoods will survive and the ones that are capable will dealing with a variety of issues and used to talking to one another a buddy system of a variety of levels. because i heard alarming things about the new orleans neighborhoods that in neighborhoods in new orleans in which there was not the history of conversations or history of shared projects and activism. the decision about the future of the neighborhoods whether they would exist or not is being made by the federal government and many of the neighborhoods will be park lands. that's the opposite extreme of what you want to have happen in san francisco. san francisco is about neighborhoods but some neighborhoods are better than another. community challenge grants are a fun way to stimulate these conversations. i want to point out a few great people in the room that you don't already know. give you examples o
in workshops and our participation there, the cpuc is very receptive to our arguments and looks like we'll be able to have movement there as well w that, that's my update. thank you very much for your attention. i can answer questions. i don't know if miss miller wants to follow up. >> thank you, mr. campbell. miss miller, anything to add to mr. campbell's presentation? >> i just want to add kind of the next steps and a couple of clarifying points. the next steps would be for mr. campbell to go to the sfpuc commission and seek authorization to begin negotiations. and those negotiations, what mike has been talking about, is the flexibility in some of the terms for our original c.c.a. implementation plan and those are in the four key areas that are potential to phase as opposed all in when we start the program. the only on obviously we're going to negotiate the rates and our original goal would meet or beat -- that's still our goal but based on what we've seen from these bidders, we h from these bidders, we have some negotiating to do in terms of that and there's some flexibility that we
school workshops. winterizing your car care is something people are concerned about. we have had a colder than normal winter. >> we have not had too much snow. cold weather is a huge problem. >> the first thing you need to check is your battery. >> check your batteries and tires. take your car in and looked over. it will give you peace of mind. >> you will show me a test for the battery. >> we will put a machine on to the battery. it will test the voltage as well as how much power it has left. it will put a load on it. juice to start a car. >> is there more stress on a battery when it is cold? >> cold weather makes everything tight. to crank and engine, it makes it hard to start. >> good deal. is that the main problem people have? >> it is both. the battery is the main thing. that can also happen in hot weather. the tires of the next thing. traction in wet roads as far as snow is concerned. >> we have a storm coming up in the next few days. so he got the readout. >> it shows you the condition of the battery, the age of the battery. it tells you what kind of power it has in it. >> good dea
together workshops that we run every other week. we focus on special events or special things that the kids could learn. it could be anger management workshops, academic workshops. it also focused on fun so we just go out and have a good time. styles we'll just go play basketball or football. we've done ropes courses. coming up, we are going to take some kids skiing. >> so you probably need somebody who knows how to ski. >> you know, you don't have to do that but we'll teach them how to ski. it is not just as much about the kids as when you volunteer, you actually learn a lot about yourself and you get to work with alet of great people. we have a lot of great mentors but we could use a whole bunch more. >> tell me a little bit about the kind of person you are looking for in terms of mentors. >> we mentor boys so we definitely could use a lot of men. however, we have a lot of volunteers in the background so there are a lot of women that volunteer. you don't have to necessarily be african-american. you can be of any ethnicity. we also look for professionals that -- business owners. we have a
have the privilege of translatg materials so they have a betternderstanding. >> back at the workshop, they are trying to take it all in. a group of men and women perform a skit about staying pure until marriage and staying faithful to haveyour spouse to avoid spreading aids. >> i am going to take what i learned her i love people and have a responsibility to help my fellow man stay alive and be healthy. >> f i ever get the chance to go to college, i want to educate e people about this disee. that is what canaday did. she told them about god and how to stay sta safe. >> you can find daily reports on the work of the church around the world at our website,wnews.org. we'll be back right after this. >> he is a pilot and inventor who grew up as a missionary kid in ecuador. steve saints latest inventio may put his friendin the pilot seat sooner than later. >> it is a flying dune buggy. >> we have a rear seat wide enough to feet 3 people across the back and have a stretcher. >> popular mechanics call it one of the 10 most brilliant innovators of 2009. >> it is hard for people who live in a d
as the backdrops featured in the film. then the studio's own workshop took those drawings and turned them into real sets. this broom was transformed into the branch of a fur tree. and the team spent an entire day skull. ing the snow. but the figures themselves came to life via the computer animation. >> i don't begin to focus on the character and instead of the design. for instance, the walk didn't start. gruffalo is a large character and walks slowly and is lethargic. >> the cardboard cutout was used to check the size against the background and then uploaded the images to the computer. >> the gruffalo required about 50,000 snapshots. >> the gruffalo monster was originally created by axle scheffler. even before the film's released, the children's book of the same name was a best seller worldwide. >> the feeling i had gotten when i saw the gruffalo move was interesting. i always grew the gruffalo from the side, so i got see him from the front and back and zehr every -- >> the gruffalo was the biggest project yet for he and his team. he and six colleagues founded the studio in 2002 when they were st
serious odds, the period was a gigantic experiment, a workshop, a festival of human achievement. what propelled this new vision of the world out of the middle ages-- a vision no longer mostly of saints and biblical figures and the trials of making it to heaven, but one that featured, also, human beings, people living earthly lives? fortunately, the middle ages were not all dungeons and gloom. in the 1300s, after a recovery from the bubonic plague, europe's agricultural and technical progress accelerated. sea trade was booming, and eventually the spread of wealth on the continent was greater than ever. by the mid-1400s, with the progress of the printing trade, educated middle classes had access to reading and writing. students flocked to italy to study the classics, and the big wide world seemed smaller. the church-- the strongest and richest institution in europe-- was under fire. voices uttered the question barely whispered 100 years earlier: should the church have the power to govern people's civil lives, as well as their spiritual lives? by the 15th century, florence was ripe for a
one that's the exterior paint serving work and didn't comply with requirements. there was a workshop earlier today regarding the lead paint and environment if you did not have a chance to attend i will be happy to answer any questions after this presentation. okay. let's talk about the coenforcement procedure in lead abatement division. typically, the enforcement procedure in this division are very similar to what donald, james and allen, described earlier. conducting and issuing notice of violation and looking decision and so on. because of the led basing ordinance the plead abate meant have enforce meant action to bring the abatement into compliance. during the complaint inspection complaint is justified and in violation inspector can have a pemty and fee with a notice of violation like property owner or contractor and here's an example. go back to notice of violation. here's an example of notice of violation and go out and find it in violation and we'll mark what kind of violation in this notice. and the next one. the penalty can range from 250 dollars up to 3 thousand dollars for
the workshop of a prestigious artisan here in cuenca, so that we can observe the whole creative process behind these famous and characteristic ceramics from beginning to end. it's inspiring to see that they still use the same centuries-old techniques to create them-- the potter's wheel, the clay, their bare hands-- without any sort of time-saving industrial process. and that's precisely what's needed: lots of time, dedication, patience and skill to finish each piece one by one so each one is perfect and unique. ♪ and if the making of the piece is a delicate process, decorating them is even more so: they are all hand decorated. whatever you go in cuenca, you'll see an endless number of shops with pottery and typical local products to take home as a souvenir or a gift. ♪ this is the old dominican convent of san pablo, or saint paul, located in a very privileged place, the huecar gorge, surrounded by craggy cliffs and exuberant vegetation and across a narrow foot bridge from the old quarter. and i'm staying here at the parador. isn't that amazing? ♪ the gothic architecture and renaissance d
to bring before the board and one of your upcoming meetings -- i think it may be the february 15 workshop that you're being polled for right now to have a lengthy discussion about pedestrian safety in terms of what is currently happening in the city, what are the mta's plans, and from the executive director, how we see moving forward, and we welcome your input in that process. chair nolan: bit -- secretary boomer: -- i think the memo that was put together was compelling about some of the problems around the non-profit -- the non-mta vehicles parking, so i guess we can go and talk about that. >> in the closed session, i think we beloved of the discussion on that. chair nolan: anything else? secretary boomer: moving on is the executive director support -- report. >> i believe there is a 6.1. secretary boomer: there is, the election of the sfmta board chairman. chair nolan: are there any nominations? >> it is my pleasure to nominate you again, despite the secretary's attempt to on nominate you. chair nolan: anyone else? any comment? ok, then in that case, we do have a nomination. all of thos
of the 17th century. to really relax, try your hand. sign up for a painting workshop. in germany, we picked a favorite alneilgemienld for me, part of the delight is just getting there. from munich, you head south on the back roads for almost an hour. once you're there, let the charm take over. murals are everywhere. bavarian villages spill over with traditional crafts and skilled artisans. mittenwald's violin mangas enheilgeigtu card for more than 300 years. mittenwald, the quintessenal pi but was a stopping place on the old augsburg-verona trade route. imagine, what a sight for weary travelers. and now let's cross the border to a major jumping off city, vienna. once you cross into austria, strains of strauss waltzes and the sound of music play havoc in your brain next come the images of cafe mit schlag and apple strudel and freud and mozart the 8-year old composing a symphony. all right, all right, so i've seen too many movies. vienna is a symphony of culture and the arts, stunning structures, and the legacy of hapsburg power. but for those looking for a getaway, it's the perfect setting
to this treatment center where they can voluntary commit themselves for three to six months. they will do a workshop -- workup on their health. they need a health care assessment, and social work assessment, they have three to six months in which they work within 24/72 upgrade their behavior is and abilities rather than wait for them to commit a crime and then send them to prison, right? we call these residential treatment centers. the place has 2000 beds. they can treat as many as 8000 people a year. in california, the reason they have so many heroin addicts on the street because you are a heroin addict, you cannot get drug treatment. the only of us who can get it are people with health insurance. anyone will tell you on the street we need residential drug treatment. take some of these dam presence, take down the gun towers, turned into a residential drug treatment centers -- some of these damned prisons. >> what are your suggestions as to the reform? one area we have not really talked about much is the impact of technology. where is that going now, and how do we need to expend that? how do we deal
meaningful workshop. >> terisa. thank you patty. people say talk is cheap and events like ours invoke a lot of talk. be worried because today, talk anything but cheap. the bill coming due and writing off the next generation is not one we can afford to pay. let's make today a day we squeeze the value from walking. when we leave today, we must walk the talk. our dynamic panel that will get engaged on this topic for today's topic. guns and violence, what's working, what's not. first we have mrs. smith. she's's senior advisor to mayor gavin newsom. david onick. malik senfero. director of bay view safe haven. children youth and families. cheryl davis. momagic. last but not least, we have jenay. >> we have tyre and then we have cheryl. john. i have a question for you. i hear there's a summer school safety plan that started in may 2007. >> they were 4 partners that collaborates on looking at summer school sites. the 4 were the mtap with muni, the youth services with san francisco police department and the security guards through the san francisco unified school district and d.c. yf. we rolled out
of the ymca. included workshops for consumers, medicare recipients, and business owners. the intent is to help people to sift through the information and help them understand the facts to clear up misconceptions about what health care reform means this year and in the future. >> one week after the shooting spree in tucson, another small sign of healing. it is the reopening of the safeway store that was the scene of the massacre. >> we entered as a group. it was wonderful. we were all able to lean on each other. >> the yellow police tape is gone. the emotions of linder. >> my heart breaks for all of the victims. >> tucson is still saying farewell to those killed and welcoming back the wounded. >> we are still on the mend in tucson. >> the vigil for gabrielle giffords goes on and so does the investigation into jared loughner's movements and motivations. the community college released this video that prompted his suspension last fall. >> this is a genocide school where i will be homeless because of this school. >> the tucson tragedy provoked a week of national debate on civility in politics, a gu
neighborhoods program. when is that -- when do we think we're going to be doing workshops on that? >> what was your question? i can't catch that. commissioner borden: the better neighborhoods program strengthening neighborhoods in community discussions in established neighborhoods. can you talk about the timeline for that and what you kind of envision? >> i can. i also maybe as they responded to the earlier part of the question, but in the work program they do staff the japan town effort. so i don't know who was around when we started the better neighborhoods planning process some years ago, but the real purpose of that is to go out and both to listen to communities and talk to communities about what it is that makes them thrive as neighborhoods. and there are elements, eight elements of a great neighborhood and all that. we just thought we would, having done a lot of planning and a lot of serious growth dialogue in several areas of the city, we have other areas functioning and could function more strongly and better neighborhood commercial districts and all that. and we have no preconceiv
be in a balcony making fun of muppets. >> while the goal of these workshops is to help turn out better pr professionals, the most daring student from the work shop try out their material during clayton's show at the new york comedy club. a challenge that is not for the faint of heart. >> i was like can you believe lisa? she is, no, in her 20s. no wonder she was such a slut. am i right? >> this has led to an award winning blog and a music company video. >> it's all about putting price on the line. >> it may seem like all fun and games, but humor in the workplace boosted business at peppercom by winning them their best client to date, whirlpool. >> peppercom stood out for a number of reasons. primarily, they had a lot of fun repertoire and some things they were doing online. and they also at the same time would interspers professional high level counseling in the midst of all of the fun. so it made them something special. >> it's because of comedy. audrey actually searched out firms and found us on the web and knew about us a little bit but saw the comedy workshops we do. she got really exc
revisited for years and the commission hasn't even had a workshop. we've been very interested in doing much about that through various procedural mechanisms, we've been requesting along with our allies, that the commission relook at that and start developing more of a record and see if the rules for setting the -- the mathematic method for calculating what the exit fee should be, if that should be revisited. and the commission has been interested in that enough so it's held workshops with all parties, utilities, ourselves and our allies and there's been discussion about the way that the exit fee has been calculated, what goes into that, is it appropriate and is it unbiased unfairly in favor of utilities, and from participating in those myself along with our regulatory staff and others, there definitely seems to be i would say a broader consensus certainly on staff at the cpuc and just the higher level cpuc by, you know, having staff be looking at this question that there's interest in moving forward on that. >> and would any changes require any statewide legislation that could be done in th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 215 (some duplicates have been removed)